Americana (57)

This 1932 Lincoln KB Judkins coupe has benefited from a 15-year restoration completed in 2009. Authenticity was emphasized, and a recent inspection by a noted marque expert confirmed its correctness. This car wears a custom body by Judkins — a firm that was founded in 1857 as a small carriage builder. Judkins furnished custom bodies for numerous car builders of distinction, but Lincoln was their primary client. Between 1921 and 1939, Judkins produced 5,904 bodies with 2,212 being offered on the 2-passenger coupe. The exact number of Judkins-bodied coupes produced in 1932 is unknown but is thought to be less…

1955 Hudson Italia

Written by July 2016
One of only 26 examples produced and one of just 21 remaining Powered by its original engine and equipped with overdrive Outstanding driver, tour- and road-ready Carefully inspected and extensively serviced by Mr. Ed Souers, Hudson Italia Historian for the Hudson Essex Terraplane Club and Manager of the National Hudson Motor Car Company Museum in Ypsilanti, MI {analysis}This car, Lot 38, sold for $242,000, including buyer’s premium, at Worldwide’s Houston Classic Auction in Houston, TX, on April 23, 2016. From humble start to cutting edge The Hudson Motor Car Company was founded on February 20, 1909, and was named for…
This Stanley Model E2, one of six models of the Stanley steam car available in the 1909 catalog, is powered by a 10-horsepower twin-piston engine — a marvel of simplicity that employed only 13 moving parts. Once the big front-mounted boiler had been filled with water, fired, and tended by the owner’s careful hands, the Model E2 could hum along and climb steep grades with ease. It was a fun car, combining the eerie silence of steam with the peppy performance that, by the late 1900s, “automobilists” were beginning to appreciate. Former Stanley employee Ralph Van Dine also appreciated it,…
Eager to shed its stodgy reputation during the 1960s, American Motors launched a daring assault on the lucrative youth market with a series of prototypes. Developed at AMC’s advanced styling studios in October 1965, the first AMX prototype — short for American Motors experimental — was developed under Charles Mashigan, a leading contributor to Ford’s original Thunderbird and Chrysler’s Turbine. AMC management was suitably encouraged to approve further development, enlisting outside contractors Smith Inland of Ionia, MI, to build a small group of the distinctive fiberglass bodies differing in fine details from the original AMX show car. While the number…

1974 AMC Javelin AMX

Written by January 2016
This is a rare find: a 1974 AMC that has only 406 original miles driven by its single documented owner. Painted in Big Bad Blue with a white vinyl top, it is a great color scheme in relation to its white interior. The AMC was not all show; it came packed with a 360-ci V8 engine that pumped out 245 horsepower. It is meshed with an automatic transmission. Power brakes and steering make for safe and smooth operation. Factory options include bucket seats, seat belts with shoulder harness, and a center console. {analysis}This car, Lot 5047, sold for $41,250, including…
This single-owner Country Squire Wagon has less than 1,500 miles from when it was purchased new at Titus Will Ford in Tacoma, WA. As per its original sales invoice, it is equipped with a 400-ci V8 engine and an automatic transmission. Conveniences include deluxe bumpers, electric rear window, air conditioning, color-keyed seat belts, AM radio, light group, tinted glass and a luggage rack. The owner stated that the “interior is as-new, no marks and absolutely fresh.” It is astounding to see an automobile that is unchanged since it left the factory in 1974. {analysis}This car, Lot 1112, sold for $42,900,…

1978 Checker Cab

Written by September 2015
Last working Checker cab in New York City Preserved in “as-retired” condition Over $12,000 in recent service Six-cylinder engine Three-speed automatic transmission Coil-spring front and leaf-spring rear suspension {analysis}This car, Lot 259, sold for $7,700, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ Greenwich Concours d’Elegance sale in Greenwich, CT, on May 31, 2015. The universal taxi In all the history of the automobile, there are few more recognizable models than the venerable Checker Marathon. If you rode in a taxicab in the second half of the 20th century, chances are good you rode in a Checker. What’s even more interesting is that…
The Stutz Blackhawk was an American high-end specialty luxury car manufactured from 1971 through 1987. The Stutz Motor Company was revived in August 1968 by New York banker James O’Donnell. He joined forces with retired Chrysler stylist Virgil Exner, who designed the new Blackhawk. The new Blackhawk was prototyped by Ghia in Italy at a cost of over $300,000. To offer exclusivity and still allow easy servicing in the United States, a custom-built Italian body was added to a GM platform and engine. The Blackhawk debuted in January 1970 at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City. Prices ranged from…
In 1969, AMC worked with Hurst Performance Inc. to create the SC/Rambler. All cars had a 390-ci 315-hp engine with 4-speed transmission. Painted in its unique “A” scheme of red/white/blue exterior with matching headrest and gray interior. Options include functional Ram Air hood scoop, Hurst shifter, heavy-duty suspension with sway bar, torque links, staggered rear shocks, power disc brakes, and a steering column-mounted Sun tachometer. This car is listed number 290 in the Hurst SC/Rambler Registry. {analysis}This car, Lot 679, sold for $38,500, including buyer’s premium, at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale 2015 Auction in Scottsdale, AZ, on January 16, 2015. In the…
Documented, authentic, original 1955 Chevy movie car driven by singer James Taylor and Beach Boy Dennis Wilson in the iconic 1971 movie “Two-Lane Blacktop.” This ’55 is one of the three built by Richard Ruth for Universal Studios (two identical straight-axle ’55s and one stunt car) for “Two-Lane Blacktop.” This particular ’55 was used to film scenes inside the car, and brackets for some of the camera and recording gear used during filming are still visible on the car today. Only used in “Two-Lane Blacktop,” it was sold to a studio mechanic shortly after filming was completed. The car passed…
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