The Euro Pontiac

Pontiac tried to re-establish itself as GM’s performance brand in the 1980s. To help it steer that course, they built the 1984–88 Fiero. Yet there was one model that had all the buzz before and during the era of the Fiero and today is all but forgotten — the 6000 STE.

For American automakers, it was a new era: Quarter-mile times were irrelevant — the new goal was balanced power and handling like the Europeans.

So began the American auto Read More

The Hot Dakota

The Dakota was Chrysler’s reaction to the Ford Ranger and Chevy S-10. It was introduced for the 1987 model year and lasted until 2011, produced through three generations.

Generally a well-selling worker bee, the Dakota did make a splash with a convertible Sport version in 1989–91. In addition, since Carroll Shelby was working at Chrysler at the time, a Shelby Dakota hit the streets in 1989 with a 318 parked under the hood. Both the soft-top Sport and the Read More

Best of the Least

Various pundits have claimed that the market is starting to stagnate going into 2019. Auctions in the Phoenix area in January generally proved that to be correct. Yet we’re no strangers to low prices in this column. Every March/April issue, that’s where we boldly go.

So, once again, and back by popular demand, I present the bottom of the sales chart from this year’s Arizona auctions.

(On star ratings, ★★★★★ is best)

1963 Cadillac Series 75 8-Passenger Sedan

Gooding & Read More

1962 Chevrolet Corvair 95 Rampside pickup

In 1962, only 4,102 Corvair 95 Rampside trucks were built. This truck is registered in the Corvanatics Corvair 95 Registry and is one of only 101 registered. All of the registry paperwork is included. It was completely restored and is in show-quality condition.

As the trim tag indicates, this truck was born Crystal Turquoise, but during the restoration it was painted Woodlawn Green and Cameo White.

Everything on the exterior has been replaced or restored, including all the glass. It’s Read More

Lincoln’s Q-Ship

Lincoln cars traditionally had unique engines, dating all the way back to inception by Henry Leland. But the purchase of the company by Henry Ford, refinement by Edsel Ford, and restructuring in the post-World War II era by Henry Ford II all led to an all-time great engine, sourced from the Blue Oval.

The revitalized Ford Motor Company of the 1950s expanded the use of common components in production. Lincoln’s first overhead-valve V8 engine in 1952 was also used in Read More

1964 Fargo W100 Power Wagon pickup

The Fargo Power Wagon is the unique name given to the Power Wagons sold in Canada. They are identical in every way to the U.S. models, except for some unique badging.

This 1964 example underwent a complete frame-off restoration and is powered by a rebuilt 318-ci wide-block engine with poly heads, mated to a 4-speed manual transmission with an NP201 transfer case. It features Warn locking hubs, new 33-inch tires, manual brakes, manual steering and spray-in bed liner.

One Hauler of a Jeep

With talk today of a soon-to-be-released pickup version of the Jeep JL-series Wrangler, it seems quite distant to think that Jeep had the first domestically built “compact” pickup. Initially, it was the CJ-8 Scrambler from 1981 to ’85, but the idea also continued from 1986 until 1992 with the Comanche. AMC billed that one as the first “midsize” pickup.

The Comanche is basically the 1984–99 Jeep XJ-platform Cherokee with a pickup box instead of a wagon body. However, there’s more Read More

1945 Dodge WC-58 Command Car

While the Army’s light-vehicle needs in World War II were met by Willys and Ford Jeeps, heavier trucks were largely the purview of Dodge. Over the course of the war, some 700,000 vehicles in the VC and WC series, from ½-ton to 1½-tons, were delivered to U.S. forces. Most numerous are the WCs, a nomenclature commonly believed to derive from “Weapons Carrier.” In fact, it was Dodge’s own company designation, dating from 1941 and unchanged for the duration.

This truck’s Read More