1961 AMC Metropolitan Convertible

1961 AMC Metropolitan Convertible

At a time in automotive history when American manufacturers were consistently arguing that “bigger is better,” Nash dared to be different. After creating a well-received concept car called the NXI, Nash believed that a small, efficient car could be successful amongst the sea of large cars being offered by the Big Three: Ford, GM and Chrysler.

In 1953 Nash put the redeveloped NXI into production, and starting in 1954, the car would be marketed as the Metropolitan. It would be Read More

1954 Kaiser-Darrin 161 Roadster

In the bustling years after World War II, American roads were peppered with ever-growing numbers of European and British sports cars. American servicemen returning from overseas duty were bringing home nimble little cars with gutsy engines and sleek styling.

American manufacturers wanted in on the action, but nobody had a suitable car ready to compete with the European invaders. Ford and GM started work on their own interpretations of a sports car, while the independent Kaiser Motors also decided to Read More

1946 Chrysler Town & Country convertible

Such was the demand for vehicles in the immediate aftermath of World War II that the 1946 Chryslers — like most other American makes — reappeared looking much the same as they had in 1942. One difference in the model line-up was that the wood-embellished Town & Country model, previously available only as a station wagon, was available either as a sedan or 2-door convertible on both the New Yorker (8-cylinder) and Windsor (6-cylinder) chassis.

With their contrasting ash framing Read More

1961 Chrysler 300G Hard Top

The Chrysler 300G was the last 300 to wear Virgil Exner’s famous fins. Major differences from the previous year’s model included a new front end with canted quad headlamps and a new rear treatment, which lacked the faux-continental spare of the 300F. The 1961 300G was tested by Road & Track magazine and it went from 0 to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds. Quarter-mile stats were 16.2 seconds at 87 mph.

Without a doubt, this is one of the more Read More

1952 Muntz Jet convertible

In 1950, Earl Muntz bought Indy car builder Frank Kurtis’s design and all the tooling for a 2-seat sports car and renamed it the Muntz Road Jet.

Muntz stretched the Kurtis “sports car” 13 inches to add room for a back seat. The styling was simple but streamlined. With an unerring eye for exposure, he made sure the Muntz Jets were visible, choosing bright paint hues and flashy Read More

1927 Miller 91

Darin Schnabel ©2015, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Miller 91 was a true tour de force of rear-wheel-drive racing technology. It was so successful and its domination on speedways of the 1920s was so complete that it was effectively responsible for its own demise. The AAA’s rule change for 1930 to the “Junk Formula” was, in fact, adopted to stop the Miller 91’s seemingly unstoppable winning streak.

When the rule change that limited displacement to 1½ liters (91 cubic inches) was announced for the 1926 racing season, Read More

1961 Chevrolet Corvette convertible

Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.

This beautifully restored 1961 Corvette is powered by its 283/270-hp engine with two 4-barrel carburetors and a 4-speed manual transmission and its original shifter. This car was built with performance in mind. Painted in Roman Red with white side coves, this Corvette features a white soft top and red interior throughout. All the trim looks great, and it has the spinner hubcaps and wide whitewall tires. It is also equipped with a Wonderbar radio.

1955 Packard Caribbean convertible

Darin Schnabel ©2014, courtesy of RM Auctions

Packard’s last prestigious, low-production offering was the Caribbean convertible of 1955 and 1956. This top-of-the-line model was completely redesigned for ’55, and it sported a new high-output overhead-valve V8 engine with dual four-barrel carburetors, which could produce an amazing 310 horsepower, put to the rear wheels through a new push-button Twin Ultramatic transmission. An innovative, new torsion-bar suspension on the chassis featured automatic leveling to suit the road surface, making the 1955 Packard Caribbean the smoothest-riding and best-handling full-size car Read More

1957 Continental Mark II

Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co. LLC

Mark II Continental with 74,000 original miles. Beautiful example of an original well-cared-for car with documented service and owner history. Loaded with functional factory options. Factory air conditioning and power windows, recent service and tune-up just completed. This car still retains a lot of its original paint, chrome and stainless trim. Lots of paperwork, books and record come with the car.

1937 Packard One-Twenty Pickup

Corey Silvia ©2013, courtesy of RM Auctions

This Packard pickup is based on the 138-inch wheelbase 138D One-Twenty chassis. The original, factory touring limousine bodywork was truncated aft of the front doors and the back of a compatible pickup cab was grafted on. An original box from another period truck of comparable size was added, and it features a ribbed steel floor.

The body was finished in black with a red pinstripe, and it is adorned with metal-covered dual side-mounted spares, wide whitewall tires, and even an Read More

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